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20130228
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary s let justick up wth tat coent from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things togher, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're ging to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- need to fund military personnel. the president exempted military personnel from
these circumstances. aise said, in some cases, that's notoingo be possible. >> woodruff: i is u.s. national security at stake because of what might happen? >> it is, in the following sense-- by the end of the year, as i said, two-third of our army units, active-duty army units and all of our reserve units will not be ready to fight other wars. many of our air force air units will not be ready to fight other wars. a third of our ships in the pacific will not be at sea. it's not becau they-- they're not there. the ips aren't there. it's because we can't afford to operate them because we don't have any money left in the accounts that fund them. and we have to cut account by account by account. that's what sequestration forces us to do. >> woodruff: if this gets resolved secretary carter between now and march 1, or soon thereafter, are will all these cuts go away. >> oh, yes, we would never do any of these things. it's everyone's hope that deals that cover revenues and expenditures which everybody knows is necessary that that deal can be made, if congress can come around with a deal like that that the p
of skilled policy advocates driving a remarkable turnaround that has already changed the u.s. political landscape. >> warming isn't, in fact, accelerating. in fact, there's been none for 15 years. >> hockenberry: there's christopher monckton, a big draw at these meetings, who brings the skeptics to their feet every time. >> god bless america. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior flow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the ca
. and it was an attempt to consolidate power and continue to centralize decision making in the u.s. house. >> a lot of conservatives are outraged by this... >> there was a fundamental dismantling here in washington of the tea party movement. i think they viewed the tea party movement as something that scared them. today what you see is, "now that we've broken you up, now you're going to do it my way." >> leadership gets rid of challenges... >> narrator: and with the election over, the deadline for the fiscal cliff was less than two months away. boehner made the first move. >> they wanted to get a card out there and put it down quickly. so they prepared a speech and went through 18 drafts. it was tinkered with right there on the teleprompter up until the final moments. >> house speaker john boehner is going to be speaking to reporters. his office says he wants to talk about the fiscal cliff... >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. >> the speaker came out and acknowledged that the president won. elections have consequens, and
decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own politics. it very ll could he been a reerndindecion. >> narrator: the president decided to authorize the operation for sunday, may 1. >> i think that was one of the longest days that he's had as president. he said to us at the time that the minutes were feeling like hours, as we waited for the operation to begin. >> narrator: they waited for the signal that bin laden was in the compound. >> admiral mcraven provided the call sign "geronimo kia"-- "killed in action." and at that point, people kind of started to make eye contact and there was this sense of not just relief, but great pride and admiration in what had taken place. and nobody spoke until the president said to everybody around him, "looks like we got him." >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> narrator: the killing of o
and the u.s. attorney community did? i think you have to take a step back. over the last couple of years, we have convicted raj rajaratnam. you'll say that's an insider trading case. but it's clearly going after wall street. >> smith: but it has nothing to do with the financial crisis, the meltdown, the packaging of bad mortgages that led to the collapse that led to the recession. >> well, first of all, i think that the financial crisis, martin, is multifaceted. and what we've had is a multipronged, multifaceted spon. and it's simply a fiction to say that where crimes were committed, we didn't pursue the cases. and that's why where crimes were committed, you have more people in jail today for securities fraud, bank fraud and the like than ever before. >> smith: but no wall street executives? >> no wall street executives. >> narrator: by september 2010, senator kaufman's term was nearing its end. before leaving, he held a second oversight hearing. >> criminals on wall street must be held to account. >> ted dided he wanted to have a second hearing before he left office so that he could questio
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)